AMBASSADORS 2017-04-01T02:39:51+00:00

CoastSmart Ambassadors

The goals of CoastSmart are to reduce public risk and enhance coastal safety, near water and in the surf zone in the Pacific Rim Region of BC. Our ambassadors are helping us achieve that goal by endorsing coastal safety through their networks. These ambassadors are highly respected and accomplished in their fields, whether it’s emergency response, surf instruction, accommodation, tourism, government or business.  We are privileged to have them on our team promoting coastal safety and with their help and influence, our messages of awareness and safety can reach a wider audience.

Raph Bruhwiler
Raph Bruhwiler
Shandy Kariatsumari
Shandy Kariatsumari
Charles McDiarmid
Charles McDiarmid
Krissy Montgomery
Krissy Montgomery
Tyson Touchie
Tyson Touchie
Oyster Jim Martin
Oyster Jim Martin
Pete Clarkson
Pete Clarkson
Karla Robison
Karla Robison
Catherine Bruhwiler
Catherine Bruhwiler
Jeremy Koreski
Jeremy Koreski
Pete Devries
Pete Devries

Raph Bruhwiler

Pro Surfer and Coast Guard Rescue Specialist | Tofino, BC

Shandy Kariatsumari

Video by: RTown Long Beach TV
Photo Submitted 

Shandy Kariatsumari

Lifesaving Instructor & Surf Instructor Trainer | Tofino, BC

The Lifesaving Society is an independent, charitable organization whose mandate is to reduce drowning and water-related injury through its training programs, WaterSmart public education initiatives, aquatic safety management services and lifesaving sport. The Society has been educating the public as well as training lifesavers and instructors in B.C. since 1911.  The National Lifeguard training program is the recognized standard across Canada with the Lifesaving Society providing that program since 1963.

National Drowning Prevention Week in July and the Annual Commonwealth Awards Ceremony for Honour & Rescue in March are important events on the Society’s calendar, both recognizing roles that any member of the public may find themselves in; that of either victim or rescuer.

Courage, bravery and quick thinking are often required to rescue a drowning person.  Many of the most tragic drownings involve children too young to swim or those in the company of others unable to swim or perform a lifesaving rescue. Parents are encouraged to ensure that all family members attain swimming and lifesaving skills to be prepared to save themselves and others in an aquatic emergency.  The Society’s Swim to Survive program provides basic skills to help children, youth and adults survive an unexpected fall into water.

Rarely does a drowning occur at a swimming facility with designated professional lifeguards on duty. Many lay rescuers however, have drawn upon previous Society lifesaving training, such as the Bronze Medallion or Bronze Cross, when undertaking acts of lifesaving.

Charles McDiarmid

Managing Director, Wickaninnish Inn | Tofino, BC

The Wickaninnish Inn story begins way back in 1955, and is closely tied to the modern-day history of Tofino and the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, and of course to the popular draw of Tofino winter storm watching. Read about the Inn’s history

Krissy Montgomery

Owner, Surf Sister | Tofino, BC

Surf Sister History

The year: 1999.
The vision: To encourage more women to try surfing and to have them feel less intimidated and included out in the water.
It began: With a truck, a few boards and a cell phone (yes cell phones existed in 1999).

Fast forward to today and not only will you often find as many women surfing in Tofino as men, but Surf Sister is the biggest all female instructor surf schools in the world. With over 30 staff, us girls love what we do, do what we love and it shows.

Once you become a Surf Sister, you’re always a Surf Sister. Year after year you will often find the same smiling, enthusiastic faces in the water with you, sharing their passion and love for surfing and the ocean. What makes us unique is we see teaching surfing as the opportunity to share what we love. To us it’s not a job. What keeps us coming back is the smiles, laughs and excitement from students.

Thanks to that enthusiasm and love, we were the first to offer progressive camps, surf camps abroad and start the local Surf Club. Surf Sister also spearheaded Queen of the Peak, an all women’s surf competition, which originated in 2010 to showcase and celebrate the amazing female surf talent present here on the west coast.

Stop in at the main Surf Sister Shop for a coffee and chat. We’d love to share our stories and stoke with you.

Tyson Touchie

Owner, Wya Point Surf Shop | Ucluelet First Nation, Ucluelet, BC

Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Economic Development 

Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Government believes that a healthy and prosperous future requires the nation and its members to pursue development that is socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable and free of political influence.

Ucluth Development Corporation oversees the businesses owned and, or operated by the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ and seeks to attract new investment. Here are some of the business activities; for more detailed information click here.

Wya Point Surf Shop & Cafe
• Wya Point Resort: campground with yurts, tent and RV parking. Coming soon: luxury lodges at Ucluth beach.
• Wya Welcome Centre with gift shop, coffee bar and garden market
• Kʷisitis gift shop at Wickaninnish Beach (Coming Soon– Kʷisitis Restaurant)
• Lost Shoe Creek Commercial Development
• Thornton Motel, Ucluelet

Chu

Oyster Jim Martin

Video by: RTown Long Beach TV
Photo by: Marilyn McEwen

Oyster Jim Martin

Visionary / Founder, Wild Pacific Trail | Ucluelet, BC

About the Wild Pacific Trail
The trail is located in Ucluelet and is a seven phase trail system skirting the rugged cliffs and shoreline of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Overlooking Barkley Sound and the Broken Group Islands to the east and the open Pacific Ocean to the south and west, it offers spectacular shoreline panoramas and seaward vistas through ancient cedar and spruce-framed viewing platforms constructed on the best headlands along the route.

About the Society
Oyster Jim is the visionary behind the amazing Wild Pacific Trail. And behind every great visionary is a committee making the dream come true!

Formed in 1999, the Wild Pacific Trail Society is a registered non-profit organization. The Wild Pacific Trail Society board is comprised of a committed and passionate group of a dozen Ucluelet citizens with a wide and diverse range of skills, knowledge and experience. Each director is deeply committed to the vision and mission of the society. Board members work on individual areas of interest: trail planning, educational programs, promotion, administration, signage, and communication with the assistance of a part-time administrator.

Fundraising is a key funcion of the society through donations, bench sponsorships and grants. The board is supported by a strong network from the district of Ucluelet to regional organizations and local business.

While the Wild Pacific Trail Society’s main focus has been trail development, their secondary goal for trail-based educational programs is emerging as the next best attraction with free guided programs and site-specific interpretive information.

Karla Robinson

Photo Submitted

Pete Clarkson

Marine Debris Artist & Parks Canada Visitor Safety Specialist | Tofino, BC

Pete is a volunteer with The Surfrider Foundation which is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network. Surfrider has built a network of coastal defenders who transform their passion for our coast into lasting protection. We are fortunate to live in a place where passion for protection is in our blood. We have a community dominated by guardians including: First Nations, grassroots environmentalists and scientists as well as ocean lovers, surfers, beach walkers and fishing enthusiasts. Bridging local knowledge together with national experts in law, policy and science, Surfrider is one of many lines of defence here in the Pacific Rim.  Check out their beach clean up schedule, here.

Pete Clarkson is an environmental artist – he uses marine debris that is sustainably harvested off the west coast of Vancouver Island.  As a Parks Canada employee, he removes items off the beach as garbage to protect the environment.  Yet as an artist, he is inspired to treat it as treasured material for creating art.

His art can be difficult to define. It’s been called environmental art, beach art, found-object sculpture and recycled art. He combines locally beach-combed objects to create layered wall hangings, sculpture and outdoor installations. Weathered rope, painted wood, fishing floats, plastic and other flotsam are the raw material for my work. He is self taught and inspired by many art forms including folk art, traditional and contemporary First Nation art, sculpture, and word art.

This short film is a portrait of Tofino, BC intertidal artist Pete Clarkson as he crafts his most ambitious and personal project to date: a memorial to the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami. He, like so many of us around the world, was deeply affected by the disaster. Years later, as splintered and mangled timber and other objects started to wash ashore, the disaster hit home again for Clarkson, and the inspiration for his memorial was born. In Clarkson’s caring hands, the remnants from the Tohoku region take on a life of their own as he shapes them into a unique public sculpture. The result is an evocative memorial that is a site of remembrance and contemplation, and an emotional bridge connecting an artist, his community and a people an ocean away.

Karla Robinson

Photo by: Douglas Ludwig

Karla Robison

Manager of Environmental & Emergency Services | District of Ucluelet

Email emergency@ucluelet.ca | Web www.ucluelet.ca

Ucluelet’s Emergency Network is a multi-jurisdictional committee that consist of representatives from BC Ambulance Service, Canadian Coast Guard, Canadian Rangers, District of Ucluelet, Emergency Social Services, Herald Engineering, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue, School District No. 70, Softwaves Consulting, Toquaht Nation, Ucluelet Volunteer Fire Brigade, West Coast Inland Search and Rescue, and Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ (Ucluelet First Nation). The committee commenced in 2009 with the original purpose to develop and maintain an emergency plan with an effective strategy to address many possible types of emergencies and disasters for the community of Ucluelet. With a “living draft” emergency plan in place, the group is now exercising and improving the plan. The next goal for the committee is to develop a recovery plan.

The District of Ucluelet`s Emergency Service Department, with the support of Ucluelet`s Emergency Network, established the motto “20 Meters in 20 Minutes” in 2013 to represent the dynamic risk and sheer reality for West Coast communities located within BC’s seismic activity zone if confronted with a catastrophic quake. The purpose of the slogan is to stress the importance to residents and visitors that after the shaking stops from a CSZ event, there will be approximately 20 minutes to evacuate to high ground prior to the arrival of the first tsunami waves.

Ucluelet Emergency Brochure Ucluelet Emergency Brochure

Catherine Bruhwiler

Photo Submitted

Catherine Bruhwiler

Owner / Surf & SUP Instructor, Tofino Paddle Surf | Tofino, BC

Flatwater SUP vs. Surf SUP

The article below is from Tofino Paddle Surf and explains the difference between SUPing on flatwater and in the surf.  Visit their website to learn more, including Transport Canada’s regulations on stand up paddleboards which fall into the same category as canoes, kayaks and rowboats.

FLATWATER SUP

When paddling and exploring the flat water zones (i.e lakes, rivers, inlets, channels, harbours etc.) we STRONGLY recommend a guide or 10+ years of navigational experience (including chart reading and a waterproof marine radio with a current operator’s licence) and 10+ years of local ocean knowledge.

Transport Canada Regulations (enforced by local RCMP) for SUP’ing in the Flatwater zones requires that every paddler has on him/herself a PFD and a WHISTLE.

*ALWAYS WEAR A LEASH

SURF SUP

In the surf zone, there are NO exceptions to:

On SUPs we have the opportunity to access and ride waves surfers cannot. With the exception of 20+ years surfing experience, if you must SUP where the surfers are be mindful of the 95% of surfers in our local line-ups who are surfing for the first or second time only.

No yachts (paddleboards) in the swimmer’s (surfers) immediate area.

*ALWAYS WEAR A LONG, STRONG SURF LEASH

Photo Submitted.

Jeremy Koreski

Photographer | Tofino, BC

Jeremy Koreski is a Tofino local and a renowned adventure photographer with clients including Patagonia, Clifbar, Adidas, Hurley, Billabong, Quiksilver, Ripcurl, Google, Monster Energy, CondeNast UK, SURFER, The Surfers Journal, SURFING, SBC Surf, Explore Magazine, Outside Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, and ESPN.

His work focusses on surfing, fishing, and the life and culture of the Canadian coast.  He represents a new breed of artists who are willing to go to extremes to capture images and footage that were hindering a decade ago.

Pete DeVries

Photo by: Jeremy Koreski

Pete DeVries

Professional Surfer | Tofino, BC